Institute Learning Objectives

Beatrice Beebe, PhD

Infant Research and Adult Treatment

September 24, 2016
Through participating in this workshop — the presentations, experiential exercises, and discussions – participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss what is meant by a dyadic systems view of self- and interactive regulation.
  2. Apply a dyadic systems view of face-to-face communication to adult treatment.
  3. Describe differences in the patterns of 4-month interaction associated with 12-month secure versus disorganized infant attachment.
  4. Differentiate among dysregulations of mother and infant attention, affect, spatial orientation and touch in the origins of disorganized attachment.
  5. Explain how disturbances in infant experiences of knowing the mother, of being known by the mother, and in knowing oneself characterize the origins of disorganized attachment at four months.
  6. Recognize the subtlety, rapidity and complexity of early mother-infant interactions.
  7. Observe patterns of nonverbal communication in adult treatment — such as coordination of the turn taking rhythm, the hand dialogue, and the head dance — and use them to enrich an understanding of therapeutic action.

Stephen Porges, PhD

The Polyvagal Theory

December 10, 2016
Through participating in this workshop — the presentations, experiential exercises, and discussions – participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the foundational principles and features of the Polyvagal Theory.
  2. Discuss how to apply features of the Polyvagal Theory in clinical settings.
  3. Use the Polyvagal Theory to demystify several features related to stress-related illnesses and to psychiatric disorders such as PTSD, autism, depression, and anxiety.
  4. Describe the Social Engagement System and how the brain-face-heart connection evolved.
  5. Articulate how deficits in the regulation of the Social Engagement System relate to the core features of several psychiatric disorders.
  6. Track how neural processes evaluate risk in the environment and trigger adaptive neural circuits, which promote either social interactions or defensive behaviors.
  7. Identify when a client’s Social Engagement System is compromised by stress and trauma and help to reset it.
  8. Integrate a Polyvagal perspective into clinical assessment and treatment of mental and physical health conditions.
  9. Describe how a face-heart connection defines a social engagement system and links our bodily feelings with facial expression, vocal intonation, and gesture.
  10. Identify how contextual features trigger different physiological states through a process of Neuroception.

Kathy Steele, MN, CS

Integrating the Body in the Psychotherapy of Trauma

February 25, 2017
Through participating in this workshop — the presentations, experiential exercises, and discussions – participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the role of the body and nonverbal communications and processes in working with developmentally traumatized clients.
  2. Discuss effective ways to integrate the theory of structural dissociation into treatment of complex trauma.
  3. Delineate at least four somatic interventions based on the Polyvagal Theory to increase regulatory and attachment capacities in trauma patients
  4. Employ at least five interventions that can effectively change the persistent somatic experience of traumatized patient.
  5. Demonstrate how using the Window of Tolerance can increase the capacity of clients to engage effectively in psychotherapy.

Ame Cutler, PhD

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Treatment of Trauma and Attachment

May 6, 2017
Through participating in this workshop — the presentations, experiential exercises, and discussions – participants will be able to:

  1. Explain procedural learning and its effect on affect dysregulation, emotions, and the body in relation to trauma and attachment failures.
  2. Discuss the role of the body in trauma and attachment treatment.
  3. Describe somatic interventions for working at the regulatory boundaries of the window of affect tolerance.
  4. Highlight the use of embedded relational mindfulness to enhance affect regulation and allow patients to address past traumatic events and attachment failures without becoming dysregulated.
  5. Apply simple somatic interventions to facilitate patients’ resolution of past traumatic injuries and attachment failures.

 

All Institute presenters and planners have informed us that they do not have a conflict of interest and have disclosed that they have no relevant financial relationship with any commercial interests pertaining to this educational activity. Additionally, the presenters have been instructed to disclose any limitations of data and unlabeled or investigational uses of products during this presentation. This presentation will not contain any references to off-¬label (non¬-FDA approved) use of products or devices.